Orpheus I #19

Hier könnt Ihr nach Übersetzungen spezieller Rilke-Texte in fremde Sprachen fragen

Moderatoren: Thilo, stilz

Antworten
vivic
Beiträge: 101
Registriert: 20. Mai 2010, 03:47
Wohnort: Santa Cruz, California, USA

Orpheus I #19

Beitrag von vivic » 5. Jul 2013, 20:50

Freunde, die kuerzlich entstandenen Uebersetzungen machen mir viel Freude. Hier einige Versuche zu einem Sonnett an Orpheus; keiner gefaellt mir vollkommen. Wollt ihr versuchen?


Rilke’s Sonnet to Orpheus, Series I, #19


Change though the world may as fast
as cloud-collections,
home to the changeless at last
fall all perfections.

Over the thrust and the throng,
freer and higher,
echoes your preluding song,
god with the lyre.

Sorrow we misunderstand,
love we have yet to begin,
death and what’s hidden therein

await unveiling.
Song alone circles the land,
hallowing and hailing.

- J.B. Leishman, 1960

Though the world change swiftly
as the forms in clouds,
all perfected things fall back
to age-old ground.

Over what changes and passes,
wider and freer,
your deep song still hovers,
O god with the lyre.

Pain has not been understood,
love has not been learned,
and what in death removes us

remains undisclosed.
Alone over the land
song hallows and heals.

- Edward Snow, 2009

May time reshape worlds
like a wind molds foam,
love’s work does return
to the primordial home.

Beyond the parade of forms,
freer and higher,
your first song resounds,
God of the Lyre.

We can’t master our grief
nor the maze of romance,
nor see through the curtain

lowered by death.
What makes life sacred:
your song o’er the lands.

Vito, 2010, version 1

Though in the sculpting hands of life
like clouds in wind our time is clay
what once we fully form in love
will find its way to oldest ground.

Who sang the first, the only song?
Above the weather’s play of form
you hug the storm and fling it wide,
Orpheus maestro! Mystic troubador!

No map for us to detour grief,
no dummies’ guidebook, how to love,
and locked remains the gate of death,

bars us like iron from our kin.
Only far above you sing and sing
blessing the dying that we live.

Vito, 2010, version 2

let change go melt world, shift shape mold
slip dreams as quick as clouds away
still what is formed and whole will stay
home safely fall to lasting old

up all over meander clamber roar
coos sweet and single solitary one
sings first and old and only always-song
god’s father’s mother’s lonely troubador

question: gasp why rasp what gash of soul
take courses: bedmate One-Oh-One
nor do not know what death has stole

nor where is Orpheus when he’s run
but golden glory-throat his hymn strums on!
Oh gorgeous god-gave end-beginning song!

Vito, 2009
Aber noch ist uns das Dasein verzaubert; an hundert Stellen ist es noch Ursprung.

stilz
Beiträge: 1182
Registriert: 26. Okt 2004, 10:25
Wohnort: Klosterneuburg

Re: Orpheus I #19

Beitrag von stilz » 12. Jul 2013, 08:14

Lieber Vito,

danke für diese Übersetzungen!
Ich habe mich sofort hingesetzt, um eine eigene zu versuchen --- aber bis ich die herzeigen kann, dauert es wohl noch eine ganze Weile. Denn jetzt, da ich weiß, daß es (wie Leishman zeigt!) menschenmöglich ist, sowohl den Reim als auch den Rhythmus in die englische Sprache hinüberzukriegen, habe ich natürlich den Anspruch, das auch zu schaffen (und muß damit zweifeln, ob ich überhaupt jemals eine Übersetzung zustandebringen werde...) - - -

Hier der Vollständigkeit halber das Original:
  • Wandelt sich rasch auch die Welt
    wie Wolkengestalten,
    alles Vollendete fällt
    heim zum Uralten.

    Über dem Wandel und Gang,
    weiter und freier,
    währt noch dein Vor-Gesang,
    Gott mit der Leier.

    Nicht sind die Leiden erkannt,
    nicht ist die Liebe gelernt,
    und was im Tod uns entfernt,

    ist nicht entschleiert.
    Einzig das Lied überm Land
    heiligt und feiert.

Auch Deine eigenen Versuche haben mich beeindruckt (den dritten muß ich allerdings noch ein paarmal lesen, um ihn ganz zu begreifen).
Ich bin etwas erstaunt, wie Du in Deinen ersten beiden Versionen "love" bereits im ersten Quartett einsetzt – das, was Rilke als „vollendet“ bezeichnet, ist bei Dir "love's work" bzw "what once we fully form in love"; das macht mich nachdenklich, denn Rilke sagt ja im ersten Terzett: »nicht ist die Liebe gelernt«... das scheint mir im Augenblick ein Widerspruch zu sein.

Ich denke auch an »das, was Stern wird jede Nacht und steigt« (aus dem Gedicht Abend) – und frage mich, ob das dasselbe sein kann wie das „Vollendete“, das „heimfällt zum Uralten“. Ob es nicht einen Unterschied geben muß zwischen dem, das heimfällt, und dem, das steigt... und: worin dieser Unterschied liegen könnte...

Danke auch für diesen Gedankenanstoß!

Herzlichen Gruß,
Ingrid
"Wenn wir Gott mehr lieben, als wir den Satan fürchten, ist Gott stärker in unseren Herzen. Fürchten wir aber den Satan mehr, als wir Gott lieben, dann ist der Satan stärker." (Erika Mitterer)

stilz
Beiträge: 1182
Registriert: 26. Okt 2004, 10:25
Wohnort: Klosterneuburg

Re: Orpheus I #19

Beitrag von stilz » 12. Jul 2013, 20:21

Hier nun also mein Versuch (wieder mit meinem "copyright", ich kann es einfach nicht anders... vielleicht gelingt es uns ja, ein gemeinsames "copyright" zu verfassen?):

  • XIX. Sonett

    Wandelt sich rasch auch die Welt
    wie Wolkengestalten,
    alles Vollendete fällt
    heim zum Uralten.

    Über dem Wandel und Gang,
    weiter und freier,
    währt noch dein Vor-Gesang,
    Gott mit der Leier.

    Nicht sind die Leiden erkannt,
    nicht ist die Liebe gelernt,
    und was im Tod uns entfernt,

    ist nicht entschleiert.
    Einzig das Lied überm Land
    heiligt und feiert.

    Rainer Maria Rilke,
    aus: Die Sonette an Orpheus, Erster Teil (1922)
  • Swiftly though changing is all
    as clouds are shaping,
    that which seems perfect will fall,
    home not escaping.

    Over the changing and pace,
    too free to retire,
    thy proem still hovers in space,
    God with the lyre.

    Neither we learned how to love,
    nor do we know our distress.
    That which removes us in death,

    resists unveiling.
    Solely the song from above
    brings blessing and healing.

    (translation: stilz)


In lieu of a Copyright:
If you want to make my translation known to anyone else: please put it in context with Rilke’s original poem and attach the remark „translation: stilz“.

It is my genuine concern to thus make every reader realize not only that my text is a translation, but also – and this is why I want it to be connected with my nickname – that it is the comprehension of one single person which expresses itself in this translation. (If you want to know more about the thoughts that made me ask this, read here).

Anstelle eines Copyrights:
Ich bitte darum, meine Übersetzung nur gemeinsam mit Rilkes Originaltext und mit dem Zusatz "translation: stilz" anderen Lesern zugänglich zu machen.

Denn es ist mir ein großes Anliegen, daß jeder Leser darauf aufmerksam wird, erstens daß es sich um eine Übersetzung handelt, und zweitens (und vor allem deshalb möchte ich meinen nickname damit verbunden wissen) daß es das Verständnis eines einzelnen Menschen ist, das sich in dieser Übersetzung manifestiert hat.
Hier erkläre ich ausführlicher, welche Gedankengänge mich zu dieser Bitte veranlaßt haben.
Zuletzt geändert von stilz am 13. Jul 2013, 16:43, insgesamt 1-mal geändert.
"Wenn wir Gott mehr lieben, als wir den Satan fürchten, ist Gott stärker in unseren Herzen. Fürchten wir aber den Satan mehr, als wir Gott lieben, dann ist der Satan stärker." (Erika Mitterer)

vivic
Beiträge: 101
Registriert: 20. Mai 2010, 03:47
Wohnort: Santa Cruz, California, USA

Re: Orpheus I #19

Beitrag von vivic » 13. Jul 2013, 16:18

Stilz, a fine attempt. I have a few comments: The first line's word order is odd in English. "That which seems perfect will fall" implies that it was imperfect after all, which is not faithful to the original; "Too free to retire" also adds a negative connotation to what, in the text, is purely positive. "Proem" is rarely used today and has a stuffy, academic tone. I love your last stanza. A triviality of spelling: "Unvealing" should be "unveiling"; Schleier = "veil."

Translation is fun, isn't it? And a nice way to grapple intensively with a poem.
Love to all.

Vito (Vivic)
Aber noch ist uns das Dasein verzaubert; an hundert Stellen ist es noch Ursprung.

stilz
Beiträge: 1182
Registriert: 26. Okt 2004, 10:25
Wohnort: Klosterneuburg

Re: Orpheus I #19

Beitrag von stilz » 13. Jul 2013, 17:21

Dear Vito,

what!!! Did I write "unvealing"!!! Horrrrrrribile lectu, das ist wohl „ent-kalbfleisch-end“ :lol: --- das werde ich natürlich sofort ändern.

"Proem", ja, ich weiß, das ist natürlich "rarely used". Ich weiß gar nicht, woher ich es habe. Aber als ich sah, woher es kommt: »from Greek prooimion, from pro- + oimē song«, da konnte ich nicht widerstehen! Außerdem erinnert es ein wenig an "poem", hoffe ich jedenfalls...

"That which seems perfect will fall" implies that it was imperfect after all, which is not faithful to the original;
Well, I see what you mean, of course, but I am not so sure.
„vollendet“ ist für mein Verständnis nicht ganz dasselbe wie „perfect“.
Wenn wir im Deutschen „perfekt“ sagen, meinen wir nicht nur etwas „Fertiges“, sondern auch etwas, das „gut“ ist, „gelungen“, etwas, an dem keine Verbesserung mehr vorstellbar ist.
Wenn ein Werk „vollendet“ ist, dann kann das entweder dasselbe wie „perfekt“ bedeuten, oder aber es bedeutet, daß eventuelle „Fehler“ drinbleiben, weil die Arbeit an diesem Werk – aus welchen Gründen auch immer – beendet ist.
Was aber bedeutet es, wenn ein „vollendetes“ Werk „heimfällt“ (im Gegensatz zu »Stern wird jede Nacht und steigt«)?
Ich denke hier unwillkürlich an eine Art „Einschmelzen“, um als „Material" für ein neues „Werk" zu dienen...
Daher mein "That which seems perfect".

Und
"Too free to retire" also adds a negative connotation to what, in the text, is purely positive.
Yes I know.
Still --- is'nt it wonderful that what was meant as a pre-song is still there? Somehow "freer and higher" or something like that seemed too "normal" to express this wonder... and then I asked myself: »weiter und freier« compared to --- what?

Thank you for loving my last stanza --- still, Rilke doesn't make the song "bring" anything... :wink:

Yes: Translating is a great joy for me.

---

Und nun, nachdem ich meinen eigenen Versuch beendet habe, habe ich Deine Übersetzungen nochmal in Ruhe gelesen (ich wollte das vorher nicht tun, sonst wäre mir womöglich nix Eigenes mehr eingefallen).

Am allerbesten von allen (auch besser als meine eigene) gefällt mir inzwischen Vito, 2009. Auch wenn ich es vielleicht nicht mehr „Übersetzung“ nennen würde... es scheint mir eine Übertragung zu sein nicht nur in eine andere Sprache, sondern auch in eine andere Zeit, und überhaupt: in ein anderes Menschenherz.
(And no - I won't try to tell you where you seem to "add" something to Rilke, or to alter the meaning of his words just a tiny little bit... :wink: )

Herzlichen Gruß,
Ingrid
"Wenn wir Gott mehr lieben, als wir den Satan fürchten, ist Gott stärker in unseren Herzen. Fürchten wir aber den Satan mehr, als wir Gott lieben, dann ist der Satan stärker." (Erika Mitterer)

vivic
Beiträge: 101
Registriert: 20. Mai 2010, 03:47
Wohnort: Santa Cruz, California, USA

Re: Orpheus I #19

Beitrag von vivic » 15. Jul 2013, 04:28

Liebe Stilz, ich war natuerlich gar nicht streng genug mit dir! "Home not escaping" is yet another addition of negativity where there is none in the original; "neither we learned how to love" is simply not English; to preserve the syllable count, you could try "neither have we learned to love." Aber der Ursprung aller "Fehler" ist dein Entschluss, unbedingt zu reimen; da ist man immer versucht, Worte zu gebrauchen, die gar nicht richtig passen.

Aber es freut mich sehr, dass du meine wilde moderne Loesung (2009) gern hast! Hast du "bedmate one-oh-one" verstanden? In American colleges an introductory course in a subject is often numbered 101, so we can have German Literature 101 and so on. Wahrscheinlich weisst du das alles. Also, we use the phrase "one on one" to refer to a confrontation between two people. So "one oh one" tries to merge all these connotations, adding a subtly sexual "oh!"

Wenn ich mir heute das Gedicht ueberlege, stoert mich eine Frage. Ich habe immer "faellt Heim zum Uralten" als ein glueckliches, positives Ereignis gelesen. "Fallen" aber fuer Rilke kann auch tragisch gemeint sein; die Elegien enden ja mit "der Ruehrung, die uns beinahe bestuerzt, wenn ein Glueckliches faellt." Handelt es sich in diesen zwei Gedichten von dem gleichen "Fallen"??

Da kannst du mir sicher helfen!

Vivic
Aber noch ist uns das Dasein verzaubert; an hundert Stellen ist es noch Ursprung.

stilz
Beiträge: 1182
Registriert: 26. Okt 2004, 10:25
Wohnort: Klosterneuburg

Re: Orpheus I #19

Beitrag von stilz » 17. Jul 2013, 21:43

Lieber Vivic,

:D ja, sei nur ruhig streng mit mir! Ich weiß gut, daß es im allgemeinen nur gestattet ist, etwas aus einer fremden Sprache in die eigene zu übersetzen, nicht aber umgekehrt. Ich habe mich ganz frech über diese Regel hinweggesetzt und muß nun natürlich Kritik aushalten.
vivic hat geschrieben:"neither we learned how to love" is simply not English;
Oh. Also, ich muß zugeben, daß mir diese Zeile auch selbst noch nicht gefällt. Ich hätte aber nicht gedacht, daß man das überhaupt gar nicht sagen kann. Wäre "Not did we learn how to love" möglich?

vivic hat geschrieben:Aber der Ursprung aller "Fehler" ist dein Entschluss, unbedingt zu reimen; da ist man immer versucht, Worte zu gebrauchen, die gar nicht richtig passen.
Du hast recht, diesmal war es wirklich ein Entschluß. Ich wollte eine rhythmisch passende und gereimte Fassung, etwas anderes hab ich gar nicht erst versucht.
Das kommt daher, daß ich vor längerer Zeit versucht habe, ein anderes Sonett zu übersetzen - Stiller Freund der vielen Fernen.
Damals ist zuerst eine ungereimte Fassung entstanden (es wäre mir gar nicht in den Sinn gekommen, daß anderes möglich wäre), und ich hatte geschrieben:
stilz hat geschrieben: (wie man deutlich erkennen kann, war ich nicht so raffiniert wie das Wiesel - mir persönlich ist der Rhythmus wichtiger als der Reim):

Das hatte allerdings zur Folge, daß diese ungereimte Übersetzung mich fast ein Jahr lang „verfolgte“ – bis ich mich endlich hinsetzte und eine gereimte Version erstellte:
stilz hat geschrieben:{edit am 30.1.2010: Die Raffinesse dieses Wiesels hat mich eingeholt, ein Sonett ist ein Sonett ist ein Sonett, und natürlich sollte es sich nach Möglichkeit reimen. Deshalb habe ich meine Übersetzung nun doch überarbeitet. Die ursprüngliche, ungereimte Fassung findet sich der Vollständigkeit halber ganz unten, als "P.S."}
:D Das wollte ich nicht nochmal genauso erleben! Auch wenn es mir damals ein wenig rätselhaft war, daß mir das so gar keine Ruhe lassen wollte.

Jetzt ist das ein wenig anders - denn ich finde, daß in dem Sonett „Wandelt sich rasch auch die Welt...“ der Reim eine sehr viel größere Rolle spielt als sonst oft.
Ich habe den Eindruck, daß diese Reime ein Teil der Inspiration Rilkes sind.
Dazu paßt, daß Rilke selbst in einem Brief an Baladine Klossowska den Reim nicht bloß als ein traditionelles, konservatives »Mittel der Poesie« betrachtet, sondern als »eine sehr große Gottheit, die Gottheit der sehr geheimen und sehr alten Koinzidenzen«.
Daher finde ich es gewissermaßen legitim, sich auch als Übersetzer von Reimen inspirieren zu lassen und sich auf die Spur solcher sehr geheimen und sehr alten Koinzidenzen auch in der englischen Sprache zu machen – das habe ich versucht.

vivic hat geschrieben:"Home not escaping" is yet another addition of negativity where there is none in the original;
Ja.
Meine Antwort auf diese Kritik trifft sich mit der auf Deine Frage nach dem „Fallen“:
vivic hat geschrieben:Ich habe immer "faellt Heim zum Uralten" als ein glueckliches, positives Ereignis gelesen. "Fallen" aber fuer Rilke kann auch tragisch gemeint sein; die Elegien enden ja mit "der Ruehrung, die uns beinahe bestuerzt, wenn ein Glueckliches faellt." Handelt es sich in diesen zwei Gedichten von dem gleichen "Fallen"??
Wie schon erwähnt, hatte ich ganz ähnliche Assoziationen (Abend).
Und jetzt denke ich auch noch an den Herbst aus dem „Buch der Bilder“:
  • Die Blätter fallen, fallen wie von weit,
    als welkten in den Himmeln ferne Gärten;
    sie fallen mit verneinender Gebärde.

    Und in den Nächten fällt die schwere Erde
    aus allen Sternen in die Einsamkeit.

    Wir alle fallen. Diese Hand da fällt.
    Und sieh dir andre an: es ist in allen.

    Und doch ist Einer, welcher dieses Fallen
    unendlich sanft in seinen Händen hält.
Also, ich kann natürlich nicht mit absoluter Sicherheit behaupten, daß es sich in unserem Sonett um dasselbe „Fallen“ handelt.
Aber ich sehe jetzt, woher mein Impuls kam, das „Heimfallen" mit einer „verneinenden Gebärde“ zu übersetzen...


:D Du hast ganz recht: Translation is one of the best ways to grapple intensively with a poem!

Herzlichen Gruß,
stilz
"Wenn wir Gott mehr lieben, als wir den Satan fürchten, ist Gott stärker in unseren Herzen. Fürchten wir aber den Satan mehr, als wir Gott lieben, dann ist der Satan stärker." (Erika Mitterer)

vivic
Beiträge: 101
Registriert: 20. Mai 2010, 03:47
Wohnort: Santa Cruz, California, USA

Re: Orpheus I #19

Beitrag von vivic » 18. Jul 2013, 01:46

Liebe Stilz, wiesel nur weiter! Ganz wie du sagst, durch Reim koennen wir manchmal glueckliche neue Werte entdecken; manchmal klappts auch nicht.

"Neither we learned how to love", "not did we learn how to love", nein, keines der Beiden ist grammatisch moeglich. Bin aber kein Grammatikus, kann dir nicht eine Regel zitieren. Ich waere versucht zu sagen, dass in Englisch ein Verneinungswort (no, not, never, neither, etc) nie einen Satz anfangen kann. Aber das stimmt wahrscheinlich nicht. "We did not learn to love" waere korrekt, aber gefaellt dir hier wahrscheinlich nicht. How about "We never did learn to love"?

Die groesseren Geheimnisse hier sind endlos interessant. Warum denn sind wir "bestuerzt" wenn ein Glueckliches faellt? Rilke had a lifelong desire to domesticate death, to make the Grim Reaper part of the human community, to invite him in. Did he succeed? I don't know. Great poetry resulted, and lovely poems like the two you cite.

Much love to all of you.

Vito
Aber noch ist uns das Dasein verzaubert; an hundert Stellen ist es noch Ursprung.

stilz
Beiträge: 1182
Registriert: 26. Okt 2004, 10:25
Wohnort: Klosterneuburg

Re: Orpheus I #19

Beitrag von stilz » 18. Jul 2013, 10:23

Lieber Vito,

Du fragst: Warum denn sind wir "bestuerzt" wenn ein Glueckliches faellt?
Bevor wir nach dem „Warum“ fragen, gilt es, herauszufinden, ob es überhaupt stimmt: sind wir tatsächlich „bestürzt“? Und was bedeutet es überhaupt, daß „ein Glückliches fällt“?

Ich denke hier an das lateinische Wort altus: es bedeutet sowohl „hoch“ als auch „tief“, je nachdem, ob man etwas „nach oben“ oder „nach unten“ mißt.
In diesem Wort hat sich das Wissen erhalten, daß „Höhe“ ohne „Tiefe“ nicht zu haben ist: ein hoher Berg ist meist dadurch entstanden, daß ein Fluß sich tief eingegraben hat - Berg und Tal bedingen einander und könnten ohne einander nicht sein.
„Altus“ bedeutet aber nicht nur im Äußerlichen „hoch“ bzw „tief“ - es kommt eben darauf an, was man messen will. Und so kann „hoch“ auch das Göttliche, der Himmel sein... während „tief“ sich auf das Innere des Menschen beziehen kann: „geheim, versteckt, verborgen, innerlich“.

Wenn ich nun die „Meßrichtung“ noch einmal ändere und sie auf „glücklich/unglücklich“ beziehe, wenn ich beginne zu ahnen, daß auch in dieser „Meßrichtung“ ein „Berg“ nicht ohne ein „Tal“ sein kann --- dann hat das für mich tatsächlich etwas „Be-stürz-endes“. Es läßt mich innehalten, es läßt mich den Begriff „Glück“ ganz anders begreifen als bisher, weiter, und ich erkenne die „Ver-antwort-ung“, die darin liegt, daß jeder Berg die Antwort ist auf ein Tal, oder umgekehrt, je nachdem, von welcher Seite man es ansieht...

In solchem Zusammenhang sehe ich es, wenn Rilke von „steigen“ und „fallen“ spricht.
Wenn man an die „Umstülpung“ denkt, die es für ihn an der Schwelle der „geistigen Welt“ zu geben scheint, so gibt es für ihn wohl für alles, was hier im Irdischen „steigt“, etwas, das im Geistigen „fällt“ - und umgekehrt.

Ich kann dieser Art, die Welt anzusehen, sehr viel abgewinnen.

---

Und danke nochmal für Deine Kritik --- ich werde diese Zeile noch weiter mit mir herumtragen, vielleicht habe ich irgendwann einen glück-lichen Ein-Fall...


Herzlichen Gruß,
stilz
"Wenn wir Gott mehr lieben, als wir den Satan fürchten, ist Gott stärker in unseren Herzen. Fürchten wir aber den Satan mehr, als wir Gott lieben, dann ist der Satan stärker." (Erika Mitterer)

Benutzeravatar
lilaloufan
Beiträge: 846
Registriert: 18. Apr 2006, 18:05
Wohnort: Otzberg (Südhessen)
Kontaktdaten:

Re: Orpheus I #19

Beitrag von lilaloufan » 18. Jul 2013, 16:30

stilz hat geschrieben:Wenn ich nun die „Meßrichtung“ noch einmal ändere und sie auf „glücklich/unglücklich“ beziehe, wenn ich beginne zu ahnen, daß auch in dieser „Meßrichtung“ ein „Berg“ nicht ohne ein „Tal“ sein kann --- dann hat das für mich tatsächlich etwas „Be-stürz-endes“. Es läßt mich innehalten, es läßt mich den Begriff „Glück“ ganz anders begreifen als bisher, weiter, und ich erkenne die „Ver-antwort-ung“, die darin liegt, daß jeder Berg die Antwort ist auf ein Tal, oder umgekehrt, je nachdem, von welcher Seite man es ansieht...

In solchem Zusammenhang sehe ich es, wenn Rilke von „steigen“ und „fallen“ spricht.
Wenn man an die „Umstülpung“ denkt, die es für ihn an der Schwelle der „geistigen Welt“ zu geben scheint, so gibt es für ihn wohl für alles, was hier im Irdischen „steigt“, etwas, das im Geistigen „fällt“ - und umgekehrt.

Ich kann dieser Art, die Welt anzusehen, sehr viel abgewinnen.
Jetzt geht es hier nicht mehr nur um Übersetzungen in eine mir leider reichlich unvertraute Sprache; da will ich gerne mitlesen.

Auch ich kann dem viel abgewinnen, was Du hier schreibst, bis hin zu den Rätseln der eig’nen Lebensverhältnisse; herzlichen Dank dafür!

Demgegenüber ist mein Einfall karg und dürr, aber ich will ihn hier einfügen: Ich habe mal das intransitive Verb „fallen“ im Grimmschen Wörterbuch eingegeben, et voilà (Auszüge):
  • FALLEN, cadere, labi, πίπτω πέπτωκα scheint πιπέτω aus πέτω, πέτομαι, πέταμαι fliege, falle in die Höhe, nach dem Doppelsinn des sanskritischen pat (cadere und volare, devolare und evolare, niederfliegen und auffliegen), wie sich die Bedeutungen cadere und surgere nebeneinander entfalten, obgleich fallen, pulti und padati nur Senkung, nicht Erhebung auszudrücken scheinen (doch sehe man hernach: „der Nebel fällt“); vgl. auch lat. petere und unser bitten, zur Erde fallen.
    A) Sinnliche Bedeutungen:
    Das Stehende, Hängende, Getragne fällt, sinkt, stürzt;
    aus der Höhe fallen, niederfallen:
    Beispiele: „fallende Sterne“; „der Nebel fällt“ (Goethe), nebula cadit, aber auch surgit, sowohl fällt nieder als steigt auf. Hier hätten wir den uralten Doppelsinn des Fallens, cadere und surgere, descendere und ascendere, wie die Wörter volare, fliegen an sich nicht besagen, ob auf oder nieder. Die Sonne fällt, sinkt, aus ihrer Mittagshöhe herab, steigt nieder; ebenso der Tag fällt; „die Nacht fällt“, la nuit tombe, die Nacht bricht ein, was sich wieder nehmen ließe, sie steigt am Himmel auf; das Wasser fällt, sinkt wieder, nachdem es gestiegen war; der Fluss steigt und fällt; so auch das Wetterglas, Quecksilber steigt oder fällt; die Stimme fällt; das Zäpflein fällt; „das Los fällt“, wie es auch geworfen wird, nach dem Fallen des Zweigs oder auch des Würfels. Aber auch:
    fallen nasci, geboren, gesetzt, in die Welt gesetzt werden von Tieren, gleichsam prolabi ex utero: in den Gestüten heißt es „aus der Stute“ und „nach dem Hengst“ fallen; sprichwörtlich: „Von schönen Pferden fallen schöne Füllen“; nicht von jeder Stute fallen schöne Füllen. Dieses Fallen steht dem fallen = crepieren geradezu entgegen.
    B) Übertragener Sinn:
    „Die Hochzeit war auf einen Pfingsttag gefallen.“ (Nib. 1305, 1); Ostern, Pfingsten fallen, treten ein, fallen dieses Jahr spät; „man muss die Feste feiern wie sie fallen“; der Zins fällt, ist fällig, muss entrichtet werden: „nu manet uns der schösser teglich strenger und wir doch dasselbe nicht mügen bezalen, weil unser zinse nicht fallen noch bisher gefallen sind.“ (Luther 2, 514a); der Brauch, die Sitte fällt, geht unter, verliert sich; wenn ihr diesen Vorschlag annehmt, muss jener fallen; das Stück ist gefallen, durchgefallen; die Kurse fallen, weichen; der Wert der Häuser ist im Fallen; das Handlungshaus ist gefallen, fallit geworden; mir fällt der Mut.
Wie weise ist doch der Sprachgenius!

Gruß rundum,
l.
»Wir tragen leidenschaftlich den Honig des Sichtbaren ein, um ihn im großen goldenen Bienenstock des Unsichtbaren anzuhäufen.«

Antworten